July 27, 2010

Backlog

…a.k.a. link dump / linkage /clickage from the past month; more to come…
inplanesight-bushwick-via-gothamist

  • Very Bushwick and very fabulous (NYT)
  • You know how we do in Brooklyn (Inc.)
  • Pitchfork is Times-worthy.
  • I managed to avoid reading any commentary on Inception until I actually saw it for myself yetserday, though at this point, I cannot possibly hope to catch up with all of the bandwidth that has been spilled (not to mention plot spoiled)—in theory and in practice, for example—over Nolan’s polarizing masterpiece. Also: A.O. Scott on film criticism in the digital age in theory and in practice; Dileep Rao (who plays Yusef) gives us the straight dope; Jonah Lehrer speculates on the neuroscience behind the film. Plus, Jonah Lehrer on LSD (in a manner of speaking)
  • Am I guilty of “a breezy writing style”? (The Economist; related: China’s microblog macro-crackdown)
  • Amid all the talk of his new book Imperial Bedrooms, Bret Easton Ellis also finds time to reflect on American Psycho (The Guardian)
  • Sasha Frere-Jones endorses music in cloud form (The New Yorker)
  • Tom Vanderbilt included a link to Dave Horton’s unabashedly self-righteous five-part essay on the fear of cycling in his own musings on bicycle highways for Slate. Definitely required reading for anyone who chooses to bike for transportation (as opposed to simply for leisure), with the caveat that it feels a bit too much like justification for my sense of entitlement that I feel when I tell pedestrians to get out of the bike lane. Still, the car culture of the US is easily worse than that of the UK (where Horton’s expertise lies; at least London has congestion pricing) and the essay actually affirmed my fear that cycling still has a long way to go.

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pulpo_paul-via-salon

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July 21, 2010

The Fabled Chinese Hipster – Parts 2.1-2.3

See also: Part 1, One Point Five and 2: Reprise.

PBR: three letters that spell the beginning of the End for Eastern Civilization.

pabst-blue-ribbon-landai-beer

However, as with just about every Chinese variant, the adjective ‘bizarro’ prevails: Evan Osnos of the New Yorker applauds Danwei‘s eye for PBR’s PRC rebranding as Blue Ribbon 1844 (蓝带啤酒), a premium craft beer.

That reliably blue-collar Milwaukee lager, later adopted by unbearable hipsters on the coasts, has turned up in China. And P.B.R., best known in the U.S. for being the cheapest beer on the grocery-store shelf, has—like so many expatriates before it—taken the move as an opportunity to change its image. For a beer, that appears to involve an elegant glass bottle and a fantastically ridiculous price tag. One bottle: forty-four dollars.

–Evan Osnos, Pardon Me, Would You Have Any Pabst Blue Ribbon
Letter from China blog on The New Yorker, July 19 2010

Osnos, ever duly diligent, also includes this link to PBR [advertising] through the ages. In fact, the story is so fascinating that he has just posted a follow-up post with a few choice quotes from PBR / BR1844 Brewmaster / Chief Representative – Asia Alan Kornhauser. Short of outright plagiarism, the relevant excerpt is reproduced below:

I formulated a special high-gravity ale called “1844.” It’s all malt, and we use caramel malts from Germany. The initial aging is dry-hopped rather heavily. Then we do a secondary aging in new uncharred American oak whiskey barrels. We bought 750 brand new barrels to the tune of $100,000. This is a very special beer; it’s retailing for about over $40 U.S. for a 720 ml bottle.

–Interview with Alan Kornhauser, All About Beer, July 2010

Indeed, Osnos’ colleague (New Yorker Beer Correspondent) Jesse Rodriguez notes that:

Traditional P.B.R. is light and fizzy with a distinct cloying malt profile, while the B.R. 1884 [sic] has a rounder mouthfeel with a notable hop presence on the front palate and finish. Is it worth the money? Probably not, but it’s definitely not a P.B.R.

–Jesse Rodriguez in Pabst in China, Continued,
Letter from China blog on The New Yorker, July 21 2010

pabst-blue-ribbon-1844-via-danwei

The interview continues with a few more telling tidbits:

There’s an audience there for it?

There’s the nouveau riche, and in China, perception is everything—look at me, I’m rich. Then also, there is another group that may be part of our market, and that’s state banquet dinners. Normally, you’d drink brandy, and this beer kind of has the look of brandy—it’s a reddish-brown color, but it won’t hurt you as much.

The beer combines a new flavor and a Western status symbol. Apart from the prestige, how are you selling these new tastes?

It’s new on the market, so I’m not sure exactly how it’s going—I have very little to do with the sales side. There is a TV commercial that’s quite attractive, that uses old still photos of the early days of Pabst, back when they used wooden barrels there.

What’s Pabst’s story in China?

We were the first foreign brewery in China, since the liberation in 1949—as it’s called there. We’re doing about one and a half million barrels there. Our first brews were, I believe, 1993; I didn’t get there until 1998. At that time, the largest-selling foreign brand in China was Pabst Blue Ribbon.

Read all about it

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Possibly more related than one might think: the hipster fashion cycle.

hipster-fashion-cycle-infographic-via-flavorwire

I would hypothesize that Chinese fashion fundamentally differs from Western trends (to which the infographic applies) at the mainstream and conservative stages, where the former tends to correlate with (said) nouveau riche and the latter is either mainstream in the Western sense or more traditional Chinese. Nostalgia, then, would be informed by Western trickle-down imagery, while the ironic stage is virtually non-existent.

Though there are examples of ironic style on display in China—Mao’s face, red stars, military regalia are today worn with something less than earnestness—there is also more at stake in young people’s fashion choices.

–J. David Goodman, Are There Really No Hipsters in China?, Slate, April 21 2010

Flavorwire via PSFK

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chinese-dorm-via-newsweek

Why the FCH is still a rare breed: Smart, Young and Broke; insert bad pun about higher education not necessarily being hire education. (Thanks Eugene; cf.)

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March 25, 2010

New Shoes

Common Projects at Gargyle

Common Projects at Gargyle

It’s high time to treat get a new pair of kicks for spring / summer… if only I had the cash to throw down for those Common Projects’ überpremium Vans…

http://www.hypebeast.com/image/2010/03/adidas-originals-hide-seek-stan-smith-80s-tf-3.jpg

Convertible Stan Smiths

nike air pepper 1 Nike Pepper Low Black/White

Looks like Nike's also trying to give Vans a run for the money

http://www.dealkicks.com/attachments/month_1003/u2010319183616.jpg

Overkill x New Balance 577 - Berlin Wall

Related: The Choosy Beggar’s Footwear Fails, after GQ’s Men’s Worst Style Mistakes.

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February 27, 2010

Still vs Moving

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February 9, 2010

All Gone Release Party @ Reed Space

reedspace_allgone_flyer

Although All Gone 2009LaMJC‘s annual compendium of “The Finest of Street Culture”—has been out in Europe for about a month now, the coveted tome is finally coming stateside to party.

This year’s edition and previous installments can be perused in their entirety in a web-based viewer here.

The Reed Space is playing host to the much-anticipated streetwear event.

All Gone 2009 Release Party
The Reed Space
151 Orchard (at Stanton) [map]
New York NY 10002
212 / 253-0588
Saturday, February 13, 7-10pm

reedspace_allgone_flyer2

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January 30, 2010

New Shoes

» Tiga – Shoes (3:48) – 8.2MB mp3 @ 293kbps

dior homme chukka boots 1 Dior Homme 2010 Spring/Summer Chukka Boot

Dior Homme Chukka, via HB as always.

At this point in short history of IYK, it should be fairly obvious that I have a thing for shoes.

http://www.dqmnewyork.com/images/sized/images/uploads/IMG_0921_-750x500.jpg

Hiroshi Fujiwara is on point as always. Via DQM.

Hair and shoes say it all. Everything in between is forgivable as long as you keep it simple. Trying to talk with your clothes is passive-aggressive.

–Rick Owens, Rules of Style on Details.com. Total classic.

An absolutely gorgeous look at Louis Vuitton's F/W 2010 Accessories via Jak&Jill

Jak & Jill has an absolutely gorgeous (vaguely pornographic) look at Louis Vuitton's F/W 2010 Accessories

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January 25, 2010

Opening Ceremony Fall/Winter 2010

Opening Ceremony posted its Fall/Winter 2010 menswear lookbook last week.

ocfw10-00 These are just a few of my favorite selections from this a solid showing from the venerable brand/store. The two installments of this collection are inspired by the French and the English, respectively, all executed in a trademark modern cut with the finest materials.

ocfw10-01

The model looks a bit too surly for his own good—I want to fight him and steal his clothes.

ocfw10-02

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January 23, 2010

Nom de Guerre Spring/Summer 2010 Collection

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nom-de-guerre-feature-hypebeast-1

nom-de-guerre-feature-hypebeast-1

nom-de-guerre-feature-hypebeast-1

nom-de-guerre-feature-hypebeast-5

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January 22, 2010

Objects

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January 17, 2010

Uniqlo Spring 2010 Lookbook

uniqlo01

Another strong showing from Japan’s answer to Gap. Some of the pieces are rather effete, but the clean lines and slim fit strike a perfect balance between classicism and modernism.

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